You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘FAQ’ category.

SQG Newsletter 2018-11 corrected

Advertisements

Here are the handouts for a class held in June 2018 on making a convergence quilt.Slide01Slide02Slide03Slide04Slide05Slide06Slide07Slide08Slide09Slide10Slide11Slide12Slide13Slide14Slide15

Ice Dyeing is super easy.  Betty Tyree taught the Starry Eyes a couple years ago.  I’ve done it 3 times since her workshop.  So, although I’m not an expert I can assure you it’s easy.

I get all my information and supplies online from Dharma.

Dharma has 2 Tutorials online:
Learn How to Ice Dye
Ice Dyeing with Ugly Colors

The tutorials have complete supply lists and instructions.

For fabric prep, I either use PFD (prepared for dyeing) cotton yardage or dyables as is, or I wash plain cotton in Blue Dawn dish detergent as Betty taught me.  I don’t bother with the special textile detergent recommended by Dharma.  I also use multiple soaks in Blue Dawn post-dyeing to get the excess dye out.

The only exotic items are the Fiber Reactive dye powder and soda ash powder.  Dharma sells dye in primary color sets, or you can buy any specific color(s) you like.  I bought my Soda Ash from Dharma, but apparently this commonplace chemical is cheaper bought locally.  Kitty bought for our recent play date at a pool supply company.  Kristen buys it as “washing soda”.

Two caveats:

  • This process works best on plant fibers like cotton; the soda ash is for breaking down the cellulose in the fiber.  It can degrade animal fibers like silk or wool.
  • WEAR YOUR DUST MASK from the time when you open your dye powder till when you cover your container of ice+dye.

Below are shots of my most recent results.

— Susan K

Kristen Farwig sends 3 recommendations she found on the great but now defunct site QuiltUniversity.com: 
 
Joyce Noell recommends searching for fabrics here —
 
Kim Clark says, “I have found some older material by typing in the name of the design found on the selvage edge if still on the fabric, and the name of the designer in the search box of the internet.”
 
Kathy Martin recommends Fabric.com
“They have just about everything and the site is easy to use.”
 
The quilter who asked this question mentioned polka-dot fabric. I put this in a google search engine —
quilt fabric white dots on navy
— and got images of fabric on sale for $2.25 up. 

TOOL:
Small Half Hexagon Template for 5” Charm Packs and 2 ½” Jelly Rolls

By Natalie Dawn for Missouri Quilt Company (SKU NOT132) – $5.95 online

INSTRUCTION VIDEO: Missouri Quilt Co.

INSTRUCTION STEPS:

  1. If not using charm packs or jelly rolls, cut 2 ½” strips of fabric.
  2. Cut out a stack of trapezoids using the template.
  3. Arrange and sew together to form braid. I construct two rows at once allowing chain stitching.


Continue adding pieces to desired length allowing enough length to square off top and bottom leaving ¼” seam allowance on each end.

Internet Resources for Quilters 2017-10

Ladies,

Thank you so much for helping with the charity kits that we call  “Beach Balls”  for short.  Use the link to Pellon’s Divide & Conquer free tutorial for help piecing the kits, but……… We have added a little extra.

On the 4 1/2″  corner squares we have drawn two stitching lines.  (This is where we get the triangles for the pinwheel quilts )  ******* you must place the shorter line towards the corner that will be trimmed off.  Stitch on the drawn lines with 2.0mm or 2.5mm stitch length.

— Betty Ann

Save

Save

I substituted for Linda Cronise.  I do lots of hand appliqué, but I hadn’t done this particular method before the demo.  I found a tutorial on-line to guide me.

More notes on my experiences:

  • I use 50 weight silk thread matching the applique piece.
  • Size 10 Straw Needles from Foxglove Cottage are my favorite.
  • Clover needle threader
  • DON’T clip any outside curves; just sweep the seam allowance under with your needle for 1 or 2 stitches at a time.  You’ll get lovely smooth curves.
  • Clip inside curves almost to the turn line.  When sweeping under, pull it fairly tight to make it a smooth curve past the clip point.
  • Points: this video is very similar to the way I do my corners.  Except — she omits my cheat of an “eyelash” stitch straight out from the end of the point to fool the eye about the point sharpness.  The video shows inside corners as well.

We had an appliqué demo in 2011 as well.  Use that as another perspective on the process.

— Susan Kraterfield

Quilt blocks that are leftover from a project or blocks that were test or practice blocks.

Other names: leftovers, part of an UFO ,WlP, (3.1 (Good Intentions) or PhD(Project half Done), reject, false start , OOPS, re-do, “What was I thinking?” , and Treasures in Reserve.

The Wisdom of Orphan Blocks: “Take something imperfect and unloved and give it a home in a completed quilt!” Tricia Lynn Maloney

Orphan blocks can be used for:

Practice square for hand or machine quilting
Practice square for new technique
Pillows
Wall Hangings
Potholder or hot pad
Case for eyeglasses or rotary cutter
Tote bag or pocket or a tote bag
Mated with other blocks for a quilt
Center for a Round Robin quilt or a medallion quilt
Pincushion
Needlecase (tutorial @ patchworkposse.com)
Table runner
Sewing table, remote or bedside pockets
Block for calendar
Coin or jewelry purse
Bookcover
Sewing machine cover
Gift bag or Decorative box cover
Patchwork Stuffed Dolls or Animals
Wrist pillow
Online orphan block challenges
Sell, Giveaway and/or Trade

A few websites to check out:

orphanquilter.com
quilting.about.com
http://www.mccallsquilting.com
sewjournal.com
quiltingismorefunthanhousework.blogspot.com

— Kathy Wickham

Converting a photo to fabric takes fewer artist genes than you might think. My secret is using software to manipulate the photo into a “values” picture to use as a pattern. My package is Adobe’s Photoshop Elements 10 on Windows, but there are several alternatives, each with their own lingo:

  • Picasa: free download from http://picasa.google.com/. “Crop” is in the 1st menu tab. “posterize” in the 4th menu tab (“more fun and useful photo editing”) does the values thing.
  • Corel Paintshop Pro $30 on Amazon: contours, posterize, and topology. Demo available
  • Tammie Bowser’s is $99 and up.

My directions below use the Photoshop Elements names for the various tools.

Supplies:

    • Photo (to which you have rights) scanned into computer.
    • Clear plastic to make a pattern (e.g. a clear photo sleeve protector or a shower curtain)
    • Dark sharpie
    • 7 or so fabrics; graded from light to dark.
    • Steam-a-seam-2-lite
    • Scissors for cutting paper
    • Iron
    • Applique Pressing Sheet (fusible won’t stick.)

pretty susanSteps:

  1. Choose a photo with nice contrast. For faces; make sure there are some shadows to delineate the features.  For example, I used this Polaroid taken by my father when I was little.
    • Lighting from the side is always good; flash photos may not have enough shadows.
    • Decide either the original colors from the photo or values of any colors
  2. If you are not using the colors from the original, then change it to black and white:
    Enhance… Convert to black and white
  3. Now, convert it to a “values” picture. In Photoshop Elements: Filter… Artistic… cutouts.  Try different number of levels from 4 to 7.  The best choice depends on the picture.

pretty susan cutouts   portraits pallette

  1. Choose fabrics
    • Original colors: about 4 value levels in any given color family; like face vs. clothes & hair.
    • Free colors: use the black & white tweaked photo with 5-7 value levels in any colors you like.  Previously, I always used realistic colors, but this time I experimented.
    • Avoid contrast in any one fabric; want constant value.
  1. Cut fabric
    1. Make a “placement diagram” by tracing face edges onto plastic with a sharpie and write POSITIVE on it
    2. With placement plastic upside down, trace individual shapes onto grid side of fusible leaving some space for overlapping.. leave at least 1 edge “extra” to tuck under another shape. (I draw “hair” sticking out where I don’t want to cut tight) Cut out loosely.
    3. For tiny dark bits, don’t make patterns.  Add those details later with markers, paint, or pens.
    4. Fuse all the shapes for each fabric level onto BACK of fabric.  Cut on shape line; except for the “tuck under” edges

    portraits diagram   portraits fusible    portraits fused

  2. Build the photo
    1. Use an applique pressing cloth for a base
    2. Arrange the pieces under your plastic placement diagram nudging into place.
    3. Set aside the plastic diagram (it’ll melt), cover w/ your pressing cloth & fuse together.
  1. Finish
    1. Fuse your motif onto the quilt.
    2. Anchor all pieces with stitch of choice. I used a free motion zigzag with invisible thread.  Other choices: the “snow” stitch (#105 on a Bernina), just free motion around like Tammie Bowser.
    3. Quilting: either quilt A LOT or not at all. Don’t mimic the color edges; those are not muscle edges and look funny. Actual edges like a nose or ear profile work.
    4. Invisible thread works, but hair likes colored thread work.

Daddys Girl

— Susan Kraterfield

Categories

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 142 other followers

Advertisements